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Introducing SCI Ambassador, Emem Udoh

Emem Udoh

"I am particularly excited at the opportunity to meet senior researchers and industrialists who are translating research output to commercially viable products and services that improve the quality of life."

What are your research interests?
My key areas of interest are animal nutrition, energetics and metabolism. Evidence from human and animal studies have shown that the regulation of feeding behaviour and maintenance of body mass is a complex process. After a period of calorie restriction, ie dieting, mechanisms drive increased feeding which is known as post-restriction hyperphagia. Together with a reduction in energy expenditure this leads to increased weight gain after a period of restriction. Within the Energetics Research Group I will examine the effects of duration on calorie restriction. Using a mouse model I will measure the physiological and molecular mechanisms regulating energy balance.

How did you first get involved with SCI?
I first learnt about SCI in 2016 through an advert for grant application circulated by the Postgraduate office of the School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen. Although I was not eligible to apply at the time because I was not a member, I visited the website to learn more about SCI.

An opportunity for membership came through the SCI Scotland 2016 PhD student competition. I participated and was one of 12 winners. The award included free membership for 1 year.

What do you hope to gain from your involvement with SCI?
I hope to expand my professional network as I interact with SCI members from diverse technical and research groups. I am particularly excited at the opportunity to meet senior researchers and industrialists who are translating research output to commercially viable products and services that improve the quality of life. I look forward to furthering my scientific and communication skills by participating in activities within the technical and regional interest groups.

Why would you encourage your peers to join SCI?
They stand to gain a lot by joining SCI with respect to information, innovation, networking and career advancement. Moreover, they would be inspired and motivated to engage their science to solve real life problems. The travel grants, study grants and free C&I magazines are very good reasons too!

Emem Udoh
University of Aberdeen – School of Biological Sciences

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