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Introducing SCI Ambassador, Emma Bardsley

Emma Bardsley

"I believe that in order to encourage novel research pursuits and the development of innovative therapeutics and medical devices, current researchers should enhance and develop their collaborations between different research groups in addition to industrial biotech and pharmaceutical companies."

What are your research interests?
I am currently in my penultimate year of my DPhil, a four-year Wellcome Trust OXION Initiative in Ion Channels and Disease supervised by Prof David Paterson. My research aims to understand the key processes involved in sympathetic-cardiac communication and to establish how these processes are altered in cardiac disease. To this end, my goal is to understand the key pathophysiological processes that underpin the onset of dysautonomia and the aetiology of hypertension, in order to identify novel targets for the future development of effective clinical treatments for cardiovascular disease.

What do you hope to gain from your involvement with SCI?
I am interested in the interface between science and business startups. This not only includes biotech companies, but I am particularly interested in building websites that enhance collaborations between research groups in different universities, particularly on an international level.

I am also interested in outreach and public engagement, and want to encourage young students’ involvement in science. I also feel I can really benefit from the opportunites for early career science schemes (conferences and events) and the SCI Mentoring programme.

Why would you encourage your peers to join SCI?
I believe that in order to encourage novel research pursuits and the development of innovative therapeutics and medical devices, current researchers should enhance and develop their collaborations between different research groups in addition to industrial biotech and pharmaceutical companies.

Moreover, outreach (to young students) will be extremely important for the future of science research, this pursuit is clearly encouraged by SCI. Finally, it is common that following PhDs students are uncertain about which career options to pursue. I believe the mentoring programme will be beneficial for many current students when deciding between various career avenues.

Emma Bardsley
University of Oxford – Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics

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