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Dr Luis Gómez-Hortigüela, Barrer Award winner 2014

Gómez-Hortigüela, Barrer Award winner

1 August 2014

Dr Luis Gómez-Hortigüela was presented with the Barrer Award for his outstanding predictive computational studies of templating and reactivity of microporous materials.

Dr Gómez-Hortigüela was born on December 6 1979. He graduated in Chemistry in 2001 by Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), being awarded with the Extraordinary BsC Prize. He started his PhD studies in 2002 in the Molecular Sieves Group at the Spanish Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica-CSIC (Madrid), under the supervision of Prof Pérez-Pariente, where he studied the structure-directing effect of organic molecules during crystallization of microporous materials.

During his PhD he worked at the Royal Institution of Great Britain from July to December 2003 and from August to December 2004. He defended his PhD thesis on March 2006, again being recognized with the Extraordinary PhD Prize. He then held a postdoctoral research assistant position at the Chemistry Department, University College London, from March 2007 to November 2010, under the supervision of Dr Corà and Prof Catlow. During this period, he continued his work on computational studies of structure-direction and reactivity of microporous materials. After almost four years working in the UK, he returned to his original host group at Madrid, where he currently holds a Ramón y Cajal research fellowship.

His current research interest focuses on the study of supramolecular chemistry of organic molecules during structure-direction of microporous materials, making an especial effort on the development of chiral supramolecular organic arrangements in an attempt to transfer their chirality to zeolite frameworks.

In addition, he is also actively involved in a Cooperation Research Project with Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia) which pursues the development of zeolite-based adsorbents for the removal of fluoride from drinkable water.

Dr Luis Gómez-Hortigüela
Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica-CSIC

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