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Interested in food safety, food security and sustainable production?

Mark Shepherd

29 Nov 2013

The Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture welcomes two new Editors in Chief from 2014, focused on the latest research in food and agricultural sciences.

Dr Mark A Shepherd (main picture) is Senior Scientist at the Climate, Land and Environment Group of New Zealand's Crown Research Institute, AgResearch. He specialises in nutrient management in agricultural systems with an emphasis on sustainable production.

'Peer review is such an important part of science and I'm excited to be helping the journal continue to grow its role in this process at a time when sustainable food production is becoming increasingly important,' he says.

Andrew WaterhouseProf Andrew L Waterhouse is one of the most highly cited researchers in agriculture by ISI, and specialises in the chemical analysis of wine. As Professor of Enology he has held the John E Kinsella Chair in Food, Nutrition and Health, and the Marvin Sands Endowed Chair, is a winner of the Medical Friends of Wine Research Award, a UC Davis Chancellor's Fellow award and holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Bordeaux.

‘The Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture's broad scope makes it an excellent platform for publishing the interdisciplinary research needed to address the complex challenges to our food security and safety,' he says.

Emphasis will be given to addressing key topics such as potential food security breaches like the horsemeat detected in UK meat products and the nitrification inhibitor DCD detected in milk powder in Asia, as well as research to underpin sustainable food production. These issues are crucial if society is to cope with increasing global population and demand for food.

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