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What an Early Career scientist needs to know about life in research or industry

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26 Nov 2014

SCI’s Early Career network is aimed at people in the early stages of their studies or research in university and industry. It is an ideal way to learn about the experiences of others who have embarked on a career path which you may be looking to follow. The network aims to provide insight on steps for career development by providing access to scientific and business knowledge, through people sharing their varied experiences at tailored events, workshops and through case studies.

The case studies showcase our early career scientists who have drawn on experiences to provide a glimpse of what to expect from a scientific career. Read on to find out what steps they took to propel them into their respective areas of work or study, and also how SCI membership could help you build on your scientific career.

They cover a variety of scientific areas, but each one offers up information that you may find useful as you think about venturing into a scientific career, or your next steps to take if you are already working or studying in science.

The case studies are grouped according to their technical areas of interest:

BioResources

  • Robin Blake - insect pollinators, spiders and plants
  • Mark Burton - research into the function of chemical insecticides
  • Agata James - industrial biotechnology, innovation, and sustainable food production
  • James Logan - new and improved methods of controlling insects which cause disease

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Biotechnology

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Colloids and Surface Chemistry

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Fine Chemicals (including Young Chemists Panel)

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Food

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Materials Chemistry

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Separation Science & Technology

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