We use cookies to ensure that our site works correctly and provides you with the best experience. If you continue using our site without changing your browser settings, we'll assume that you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use and how to manage them by reading our cookies policy. Hide

George Okafo: Chair of the Separation Science and Technology Group

George Okafo, SST Chair

2 Feb 2015

George Okafo joined SCI in 2012. He was elected as an ordinary member of the Separation Science & Technology Group (SS&TG) Committee in 2012. He became Chair/Treasurer of the SS&TG in 2014. George Okafo is a Consultancy Director/Project Leader at GlaxoSmithKline with a BSc (Joint Hons) in Chemistry and Biochemistry and PhD in Chemical Carcinogenesis from Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London.

If you want to find out more about George Okafo or get in touch with him, you can contact him via the Members’ Directory (you will need to sign in to view). If you need help searching the directory please click on the how-to guide below.

When and why did you become a member of SCI?
I joined SCI in 2012 because SCI met my needs in terms of growing my professional scientific network, building new contacts and provided me with the opportunity to contribute, where possible, to the advancement chemical science

Why did you decide to get involved in an SCI Committee?
Although, my experience and knowledge of the chemical space has broadened over the last 20 or so years in the pharmaceutical industry, covering chemical development, drug development and now drug discovery, I still have an interest and passion for separation sciences, and the Separation Science and Technology Committee provides an excellent vehicle to communicate and disseminate information in this area.

How do your SCI activities reflect your personal/professional interests?
SCI activities reflect my professional interests in chemical sciences very well in terms of extending my external network, building new contacts and helping others to learn more about chemical sciences.

What has driven your continued involvement?
Keen desire to extend my external network, building new contacts and helping others to learn more about chemical sciences.

How has being involved in SCI activities impacted on your career?
Not a direct impact on my career, but it has allowed me to grow my external scientific network and build new contacts.

How do you think that your contribution has helped to shape your Group or SCI as a whole?
I am hoping that I can help to re-energise the SS&TG and raise awareness of the separation sciences within the SCI separations community and externally.

By being involved on a committee, what opportunities have been presented to you which you would not have otherwise had?
None at present, but I am really looking forward to working with the SS&TG to build the groups profile.

How do you balance your SCI commitments with your job and workload?
There are no issues with balancing commitments – both are complimentary

What is the most important lesson you have learnt by being an SCI committee member?
That you represent a wider group of scientists and that the group’s/committees’ activities should reflect their interests.

What advice would you offer to anyone thinking about becoming involved in an SCI Group or Standing Committee?
Do it.

Related Links

Share this article