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17th April 2018
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News

4D printer process

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

Researchers claim to be ‘on the cusp’ of creating a new generation of devices that could vastly expand the practical applications for 3D and 4D printing. 

Antimicrobial steel

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

Stainless steel countertops and worktops could become more resistant to bacteria with the addition of N-halamines,

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Beeting Alzheimer's

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

The deep purple colour of beetroots could be the key to slowing down the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Child health warning

Maria Burke, 17/04/2018

Could exposures of pregnant women and children to certain everyday chemicals be linked to the increased incidence of brain development disorders?

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Drugs affect gut bugs

Maria Burke, 17/04/2018

Roughly a quarter of commonly prescribed drugs, not including antibiotics, may affect the growth of bacteria living in the human gut, according to new research.

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Elephant Dung Nanopaper

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

Elephant and horse manure could be a superior source of high-strength cellulose nanofibres used in paper-making and composite materials.

Flexible silicon chips

Maria Burke, 17/04/2018

A new method of creating bendable silicon chips could help pave the way for next generation high-performance flexible electronic devices.

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Fungal factory produces anticancer drugs

Kathryn Roberts, 17/04/2018

The natural alkaloid noscapine present in the opium poppy has been used for the past 50 years as a safe, non-narcotic cough medication. More recently, it has been shown to have anticancer potential.

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Graphene clean up

Anthony King, 17/04/2018

Water from Sydney Harbour has been purified with the help of graphene coated onto a synthetic fluoropolymer membrane.

Inkjet printed drugs

Anthony KIng, 17/04/2018

Danish researchers have inkjet printed drugs on edible paper.

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Life science post brexit

Maria Burke, 17/04/2018

Post-Brexit, continued participation in EU-wide clinical trials and R&D funding mechanisms, such as Horizon 2020, is ‘vital’ to the UK’s life sciences sector, according to a new cross-party report by UK MPs.

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Reducing coffee wastage

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

Espresso coffee delivers a delicious punch. But making cups of coffee that taste consistently good every time depends on a large number of variables.

Slower melt ice cream

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

On a hot day, frustratingly, ice cream often melts before you can eat it. But adding tiny fibres made from banana plant wastes could slow down this melting process.

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Smokin' more safely with zeolites

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

Researchers have adapted filtration technology, using zeolites, to reduce levels of possible carcinogens in smoked foods.

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Swiss army knife smokescreens

Cath O'Driscoll, 17/04/2018

A carefully targeted smoke grenade can provide valuable cover for military personnel and tanks on the move.

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