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Prof Lovestone lecture - video now available

Big Data

25 Nov 2015

SCI welcomed Prof Simon Lovestone to present a Public Evening Lecture on whether Big Data offers a possible solution for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease on 13 October 2015.

Some evidence suggests that Big Data – whether derived from biological or from clinical datasets might help progress the search for therapeutic interventions in dementia. Research using informatics as a core component will be described both in the field of molecular biomarkers for clinical trial utility and in turning mechanistic understanding into drug development programmes. Then platforms for dementia research utilising large variable datasets – essentially Big Data platforms – will be described including in drug discovery, the Dementias Platform UK and the Innovative Medicines Initiatives – the European Medical Information Framework and the European Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease programme.

Watch the video of the lecture by clicking on the link below.

Holding Slide: Prof Lovestone Lecture

This lecture was part of our series of Public Evening Lectures for 2015/6. For more details on upcoming and past lecture, please click on the link below.

Prof Simon Lovestone is Professor of Translational Neuroscience at Oxford University and also Lead for the NIHR Translational Research Collaboration in Dementia (a network of six Biomedical Research Units and Centres in England focussed on dementia), lead for informatics in the Dementias Platform UK and co-coordinator of the European Medical Information Framework. He has research interests in the regulation of tau phosphorylation, dementia therapeutics and in the search for genetic and other biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease. Underpinning all these studies is the use of informatics - clinical informatics, bioinformatics and the challenges of extracting value from very large variable datasets. .

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