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21st March 2011
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News in Brief

Anglo-Nordic venture

21/03/2011

Norwegian and UK innovation teams have signed a collaboration agreement to help meet the increasing demand for sustainable sources of fuel, food and industrial chemicals.

Closer ties between the US and EU

21/03/2011

The American Chamber of Commerce has called for closer ties between the US and the EU and a loosening of visa restrictions on scientists.

Endocrine regulation

21/03/2011

Researchers in the US and Canada have shown that bone acts as a regulator of fertility in male mice – the first evidence that the skeleton is an endocrine regulator of reproduction.

EU BPA bottle ban

21/03/2011

The EU-wide ban on the manufacture of baby bottles containing bisphenol A (BPA) became law on the 1 March 2011.

Food and nutrition research given a boost

21/03/2011

UK food and nutrition research is being given a £6.25m boost by the Technology Strategy Board (TSB) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC.

GSK student fees deal

21/03/2011

Drug giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) is hoping to attract UK graduates with the promise of reimbursing all their uncapped tuition fees.

Lab test for cancer

21/03/2011

Dogs are able to detect prostate cancer by sniffing human urine, according to researchers at the University Paris VI, France.

Promising results

21/03/2011

Austrian biotech firm AFFiRiS has reported promising preliminary results from its Phase 1 trial of an Alzheimer’s disease vaccine.

Swifter and sounder testing required

21/03/2011

In a letter to the journal Science, eight US scientific societies called for ‘swifter and sounder’ testing and review procedures for chemicals.