25 February 2016

3rd Discovering Chemistry Lecture Series: Magic, Folk Medicine and Modern Drug Discovery

Organised by:

SCI's Young Chemists' Panel

 

Queen Mary University of London, UK

Registration Closed

This event is no longer available for registration.

Synopsis

Following on from the success of the 2011 "International Year of Chemistry" and the 2013 "Discovering Chemistry" public lecture series, the SCI Young Chemists' Panel is pleased to announce the "3rd Discovering Chemistry Lecture series" hosted at Universities around the country in 2016.

The lectures will be given by industrial and academic experts who will illustrate how chemistry impacts our everyday lives in Britain and worldwide. The series aims to highlight how diverse the field of chemistry is and to provide a brief introduction to a few of the wide range of applications and cutting-edge technologies which fall under the chemistry umbrella. Titles such as "Extreme Drug Discovery", "Global Warming - How can Green Chemistry Help" and "Magic, Folk Medicine, Drugs and Chemistry" are certain to attract interested parties at all venues.

 

Attendees
Target audience: Year 12 & 13 school students studying chemistry, although much of the material is suitable for year 11 students and students studying sciences other than chemistry.


Venue and Contact

Queen Mary University of London

G.O. Jones Lecture Theatre
Department of Physics
Queen Mary University of London
Mile End Road
London
E1 4NS 
UK

 


Fees
This lecture is free to attend, to book a place go to:
www.eventbrite.com

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Additional Info

The Lecture

This lecture will describe how molecules isolated from Nature have played a key role in many human activities from magic through to drugs. It will illustrate how chemistry and chemists have developed some of the modern medicines that society now depends on an which have enhanced life expectancy so spectacularly in the last 100 years.

The Speaker

Professor Keith Jones works to design, synthesise and develop potential drug molecules to inhibit proteins or signalling pathways relevant in cancer. He has held positions within the Royal Society of Chemistry and has helped organise and run international meetings on medicinal chemistry. 
He currently works at the Institute of Cancer Research.

Organising Committee

Liz Jones, UCB 
Mark Betson, Peakdale Molecular 
Mike Lainchbury, Charles River Laboratories 
Chris Jones, Queen Mary University of London 
Danny Mortimer, Johnson Matthey