25 October 2013

Genomic Approaches to the Human Condition

Organised by:

SCI's Biotechnology Group in conjunction with the University of Westminster

University of Westminster, London

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Synopsis
One of the fundamental questions throughout the centuries has been to define what makes us human. While far from answering that question, modern biology has helped to define the components that constitute humans and animals. One of the most important achievements in recent years has been the completion of the human genome project, giving a good estimate of the genes and proteins in a human being. This has spurred genomic applications, such as genome-wide high-throughput screening of loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenotypes to identify the components that shape human health and, when dys-regulated, lead to disease. We are using the power of high-throughput screening approaches in order ro understand the fundamental regulation of cellular processes such as mitogenic signal transduction and autophagy. More recentl, we are developing novel approaches to high-throughput screening, using primary cell cultures and three-dimensional model systems in order to get a physiolocially more relevant view on cellular processes. In this talk, Dr Ketteler will give an overview of how we use these approaches to study the molecular regulation of autophagy.
Venue and Contact

University of Westminster

University of Westminster, School of Life Sciences, 115 New Cavendish Street London W1W 6UW

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Email: Communications@soci.org


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Additional Info

Speaker

Dr Robin Ketteler, MRC Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University College London