8 March 2013

Inflammation and its Resolution, A Case of Game-Keeper Turned Poacher

Organised by:

SCI's Biotechnology Group in conjunction with the University of Westminster

University of Westminster

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Synopsis

Inflammation is a formidable ally in the constant battle against infection, cancer and tissue injury. It’s a primordial response that protects against injury and restores damaged tissue to its normal physiological functioning.

In fact, our wellbeing and survival depends upon its efficiency and carefully-balanced control. In general, the innate inflammatory response initiates within minutes and, if all is well, resolves within hours. In contrast, chronic inflammation persists for weeks, months or even years. It is this breakdown in the control of immune responses leading to a persistent inflammation-driven disease state that will be the focus of this presentation.

Specifically, Gilroy will recall the crucial checkpoints necessary for mounting a limited yet effective inflammatory response. In particular, he will focus on the role of lipid mediators in this setting and discuss how endogenous eicosanoids are critical for immune suppression and resolution on the one hand, but in the context of chronic inflammatory diseases assume a different more detrimental role leading to immune suppression and substantial susceptibility to infection and morality.


Venue and Contact

University of Westminster

University of Westminster, School of Life Sciences, 115 New Cavendish Street London W1W 6UW

For a Map click here.

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Email: Communications@soci.org


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Additional Info

Speaker

Professor Derek Gilroy
Metabolism and Experimental Therapeutics, Division of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University College London.