6 October 2015

The Compatibility Gene

Organised by:

SCI's London Group in partnership with UCL's Chemical & Physical Society

UCL, London

Registration Closed

This event is no longer available for registration.

Synopsis

In The Compatibility Gene, leading scientist Daniel M Davis tells the story of the crucial genes that define our relationships, our health and our individuality. We each possess a similar set of around 25,000 genes. Yet a tiny, distinctive cluster of these genes plays a disproportionately large part in how our bodies work. These few genes, argues Davis, hold he key to who we are as individuals and our relationship to the world: how we combat disease, how are brains are wired, how attractive we are, even how likely we are to reproduce.

The Compatibility Gene follows the remarkable history of these genes' discovery. From the British scientific pioneers who struggled to understand the mysteries of transplants to the Swiss zoologist who devised a new method of assessing potential couples' compatibility based on the smell of worn T-shirts, Davis traces a true scientific revolution in our understanding of the human body: a global adventure spanning some sixty years.

'Lab work has rarely been made to seem more interesting or heroic' (Bill Bryson, Guardian Books of the Year).

The lecture will be preceded by tea/coffee in the Nyholm room and followed by a Mixer in the Nyholm Room.


Venue and Contact

UCL

Department of Chemistry
University College London
20 Gordon Street
London, WC1H 0AJ

Please click here for a location map.

SCI Comms Team

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7598 1594

Email: communications@soci.org


Fees
This is a FREE event. No need to book. Please check this page for any updates or changes before attending the event.

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Additional Info

Speaker

Prof Daniel M Davis
Director of Research in the Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research