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Journal Highlights: January 2019

Highlights

4 Feb 2019

SCI's peer-reviewed journals provide research studies and commentary articles undertaken by top scientists in emerging areas, addressing global audiences by crossing academic, industrial, government and science policy sectors.

Here are some of the highlights from the most recent issues of our journals. To view the full range of SCI's journals, visit our Publications page!

Computer modelling finds chemically simpler pesticides

PesticidesPest Management Science DOI: 10.1002/ps.5217 

Natural products have been and continue to be a source of products, starting materials, and inspiration for the discovery and development of new chemical tools for crop protection. This study finds that computer modelling‐based design leads to highly insecticidal, chemically simpler synthetic mimics of the natural pesticide spinosyn products that are active in the field.

EU should change GM rules to compete with future challenges

GM legislation Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture DOI: 10.1002/jsfa.9227

The European Commission's assessment and approval process for genetically modified (GM) crops has resulted in only two GM crop varieties being licensed for cultivation in the EU, one of which has been withdrawn. To avoid further damage, the EU should shift its position on plant biotechnology if agriculture is to meet the challenges of coming decades.

Addition of biochar could improve food waste disposal process

food waste Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology DOI: 10.1002/jctb.5797

Although anaerobic digestion is a promising alternative for disposal and reuse of food waste, this process is yet to be optimised and options for its stabilisation must be developed. Addition of biochar and industrial FeCl3 appear as an economically‐feasible alternative for stabilising the valorisation of food waste at industrial scale.

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