Past Recipients - Process Chemistry Award

Year

Winner

Topic

2022

John Blacker
University of Leeds

For recognition of his work in processes chemistry that involve catalysis, continuous flow processes and reactors, biotechnology and sustainability.

2020

Ross Denton
University of Nottingham

Design, development and applications of catalytic synthesis methods based on phosphorus and silicon

2019

Ian Fairlamb
University of York

Understanding of palladium-catalysed reactions

2018

Graham Sandford
Durham University

Selective direct fluorination and continuous flow fluorination technology development

2017

Peter O’Brien
University of York

Lithiation-trapping of saturated nitrogen heterocycles and in situ React IR spectroscopy for monitoring the lithiation step

2016

Michael Willis
University of Oxford

Introduction of DABSO as a convenient source of sulfur dioxide for the synthesis of sulfones and sulfonamides, and work on catalytic hydroacylation

2014

Steven Nolan
University of St Andrews

Development and application of NHC ligands and other transition metal catalysts

2013

Kevin Booker-Milburn
University of Bristol

Development of photochemical techniques in flow

2012

Tim Donohoe
University of Oxford

Development of catalytic approaches to the synthesis of complex aromatic heterocycles

2011

Mike Greaney
University of Manchester

Development of catalytic C-H insertion and decarboxylative coupling processes and their application to the synthesis of challenging heterocylic compounds

2010

Guy Lloyd-Jones
University of Edinburgh

Sustained and world-leading contributions to the fundamental understanding of important chemical processes, which are currently, or have the potential, to be widely used by the chemistry-using industries

2009

Varinder Aggarwal
University of Bristol

Enantiodivergent approaches to the synthesis of challenging stereocentres, particularly through the application of novel boron mediated processes

2008

Jianliang Xiao
University of Liverpool

Design of synthetic methodology through a fundamental mechanistic understanding of organometallic chemistry – e.g. asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones and direct acylation of aryl bromides with aldehydes

2007

Nick Turner
University of Manchester

Numerous contributions to practical application of biotransformations – recent development of transaminase catalysed reactions of particular importance

2006

Barry Lygo
University of Nottingham

Asymmetric Phase Transfer Catalysis – introduction of new catalysts with a step change in enantioselectivity, particularly applied to amino acid synthesis and epoxidation reactions

2005

Jonathan Williams
University of Bath

Hydrogen Borrowing Methodology – particularly the potential to use alcohols in place of alkylating agents or aldehydes

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